Contact Me

Where Can You Find Me?

You’ll find me at Beamsville District Secondary School:

4317 Central Avenue
Beamsville, ON
L0R 1B0

Semester 1

Pd 1 – TEJ3M/4M Computer Engineering Technology
Pd 2 – TEJ2O Computer Technology
Pd 3 – prep period 
Pd 4 – Co-op
All classes are in room 3-209.

Semester 2

Pd 1 – ICS3C/3U/4C/4U Computer Science
Pd 2 – prep period 
Pd 3 – BTT1O ICT In Business
Pd 4 – TGJ2O/3M/4M Communications Technology

All classes are in room 3-209.

Contacting Me

There are a number of options for you to contact me.

  1. You can email me directly at pbeens@gmail.com,
  2. Leave me a message (voice or text) at (716) 299-8526, or
  3. Fill in this form.
 

Affinity Designer Tutorials

This is a work in progress…

  1. Affinity Designer 1.5 Overview (marketing video) (difficulty: n/a)
  2. The A to Z of Affinity Designer (“This A to Z list breaks down all the tools and panels, including some useful functions and features. It includes links to Affinity’s official short video tips and descriptions of what each tool can do to help you become acquainted with this program.”)
  3. Affinity Designer Tutorial: The Basics (overview video) (difficulty: 0)
  4. Basic Eyes (very basic) (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  5. 3D Cube (very basic) (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  6. Ketchup for Blood Book Cover (blog w/ video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  7. Fish in a Bubble  (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  8. Shopping Logo (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  9. Gear Head Logo (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  10. Artistic Text (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  11. Metal Text (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  12. Glossy Sphere (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  13. Flat Clock Design (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  14. Fire Text Effect (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  15. Wood Text with Reflection and Shadow (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  16. Pumpkin Carriage (text tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  17. Water Drops (video tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  18. Water Dispersion Effect (video tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  19. Flat Design Birthday Cake (text tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  20. Let’s make BB8 (video tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  21. Captain America Shield (video tutorial) (difficulty: 4)
  22. Festive Christmas Fireplace (video tutorial) (difficulty: 4)
  23. Bunny Cupcake (speed art) (difficulty: 4)
  24. Cute Rooster (text tutorial) (difficulty: 5)
  25. Python Trace (video tutorial) (difficulty: 5)
  26. Making Galaxy (video tutorial) (difficulty: TBD)
  27. Dog Sketch Tracing | Part 2 (video tutorial) (difficulty: TBD)
  28. Lighthouse (text tutorial) (difficulty: TBD)

For the 2016-2017 BTT1O students, you must do a minimum of 8 tutorials, with no more than one “very basic” tutorial. The two that are mandatory are:

  1. Python Trace
  2. Cute Rooster

There are many additional AD tutorials at tutsplus.com and frankentoon.com.

AML EULAs in Plain English

I recently had the pleasure of being in the audience for a presentation from Carol Arcus, Vice-President, The Association for Media Literacy (AML).

AML has many amazing resources for teachers at both their website and their YouTube channel.

One of the highlights for me was their “EULA Project”, where they have taken many social media end-user licence agreements and converted them to plain English posters that can be displayed in your classroom for your students, all for free.

Here’s an example, posted in low-res only (see the link below for full-sized PDFs):

Snapchat EULA
Snapchat EULA in Plain English

To see AML’s EULA Project in its entirety, visit http://www.aml.ca/i-agree/ where you can download PDF versions of each EULA poster.

(Also see http://www.aml.ca/agency-and-privacy/ for additional information about this project.)

Archiving Your Google Data

I always encourage students to use the personal Google account for school work so they still “own” the data after they leave high school.

But what if they haven’t, and they’re above to move on to a postsecondary school or the workplace?

There are basically two options:

  1. Move your data to your personal account
  2. Download your data

To move your data to a new account, just visit https://takeout.google.com/transfer and enter the relevant information. Just be sure you have enough disk quota in your personal account or you may run into trouble.

To download your data, visit https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout and select the data you want to download. Note that this can take a long time, depending on how much data you have in your Google account.

 

Cool Tech

Assignment

Over the semester, you will be required to do two informal presentations related to “Cool Tech”. Most students will choose to present on something technological (computer hardware, software, game platforms, entertainment hardware, etc.) that is relatively new, but you may also choose something else with the permission of your instructor.

For grade 9’s and 10’s, your presentation will be very informal. All you have to do before the presentation is submit your topic on the form below, and of course research the topic well enough that you can talk about it to the class. Continue reading “Cool Tech”

STL SketchUp Extension

Download the STL Export extension from here. Remember which folder you downloaded it into.

Open SketchUp.

Open the Window menu, then choose Preferences.

Click on Extensions, then Install Extension.

Browse to where  you downloaded the file, then follow the instructions to install it.

The export extension will now be usable from the File ► Export STL… menu.

Keytag Instructions

We are going to make personalized keytags using SketchUp, which can be downloaded free of charge from http://www.sketchup.com/download.

Download the template from here and remember where you saved it!

Double-click on the downloaded file to open it.

Choose the top top template (“Simple Template – Feet and Inches”) when SketchUp starts.

Insert your name, with a height of 16 mm and an extrusion height of 2 mm. When inserting, try to insert it close to one of the corners of the blank rectangle (not directly into the keytag itself).

  • Tools > 3D Text
  • Height: 16mm
  • Extrusion: 2mm

Size your text (using the Scale tool “S”) your name to the approximate size of the rectangle.

Make a copy (Ctrl-C) of your name and paste it (Ctrl-V) near the keytag. The Orbit tool “O” will be your best friend when doing this! (hint: Shift-O lets you pan the screen)

Move “M” the text down to the rectangle in the keytag.

Once you are are confident your model is correct, delete the original rectangle so you are only left with the keytag.

Save your keytag in your M drive with a filename similar to:

  • Full Name – Name of School – Keytag Text.skp (where Keytag Text is the actual text on the Keytag if it is different than your name).

Example:

  • Britney Smith – Senator Gibson – Leafs.skp

Once you have saved your  SKP file with the proper filename, export it as an STL file using the File ► Export STL… menu. If you do not have this menu, follow these instructions to install it.

To submit your STL file for printing, look for the assignment in Google Classroom.