Affinity Designer Tutorials

This is a work in progress…

  1. Affinity Designer 1.5 Overview (marketing video) (difficulty: n/a)
  2. The A to Z of Affinity Designer (“This A to Z list breaks down all the tools and panels, including some useful functions and features. It includes links to Affinity’s official short video tips and descriptions of what each tool can do to help you become acquainted with this program.”)
  3. Affinity Designer Tutorial: The Basics (overview video) (difficulty: 0)
  4. Basic Eyes (very basic) (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  5. 3D Cube (very basic) (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  6. Ketchup for Blood Book Cover (blog w/ video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  7. Fish in a Bubble  (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  8. Shopping Logo (video tutorial) (difficulty: 1)
  9. Gear Head Logo (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  10. Artistic Text (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  11. Metal Text (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  12. Glossy Sphere (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  13. Flat Clock Design (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  14. Fire Text Effect (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  15. Wood Text with Reflection and Shadow (video tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  16. Pumpkin Carriage (text tutorial) (difficulty: 2)
  17. Water Drops (video tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  18. Water Dispersion Effect (video tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  19. Flat Design Birthday Cake (text tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  20. Let’s make BB8 (video tutorial) (difficulty: 3)
  21. Captain America Shield (video tutorial) (difficulty: 4)
  22. Festive Christmas Fireplace (video tutorial) (difficulty: 4)
  23. Bunny Cupcake (speed art) (difficulty: 4)
  24. Cute Rooster (text tutorial) (difficulty: 5)
  25. Python Trace (video tutorial) (difficulty: 5)
  26. Making Galaxy (video tutorial) (difficulty: TBD)
  27. Dog Sketch Tracing | Part 2 (video tutorial) (difficulty: TBD)
  28. Lighthouse (text tutorial) (difficulty: TBD)

For the 2016-2017 BTT1O students, you must do a minimum of 8 tutorials, with no more than one “very basic” tutorial. The two that are mandatory are:

  1. Python Trace
  2. Cute Rooster

There are many additional AD tutorials at tutsplus.com and frankentoon.com.

AML EULAs in Plain English

I recently had the pleasure of being in the audience for a presentation from Carol Arcus, Vice-President, The Association for Media Literacy (AML).

AML has many amazing resources for teachers at both their website and their YouTube channel.

One of the highlights for me was their “EULA Project”, where they have taken many social media end-user licence agreements and converted them to plain English posters that can be displayed in your classroom for your students, all for free.

Here’s an example, posted in low-res only (see the link below for full-sized PDFs):

Snapchat EULA
Snapchat EULA in Plain English

To see AML’s EULA Project in its entirety, visit http://www.aml.ca/i-agree/ where you can download PDF versions of each EULA poster.

(Also see http://www.aml.ca/agency-and-privacy/ for additional information about this project.)

Archiving Your Google Data

I always encourage students to use the personal Google account for school work so they still “own” the data after they leave high school.

But what if they haven’t, and they’re above to move on to a postsecondary school or the workplace?

There are basically two options:

  1. Move your data to your personal account
  2. Download your data

To move your data to a new account, just visit https://takeout.google.com/transfer and enter the relevant information. Just be sure you have enough disk quota in your personal account or you may run into trouble.

To download your data, visit https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout and select the data you want to download. Note that this can take a long time, depending on how much data you have in your Google account.

 

Cool Tech

Assignment

Over the semester, you will be required to do two informal presentations related to “Cool Tech”. Most students will choose to present on something technological (computer hardware, software, game platforms, entertainment hardware, etc.) that is relatively new, but you may also choose something else with the permission of your instructor.

For grade 9’s and 10’s, your presentation will be very informal. All you have to do before the presentation is submit your topic on the form below, and of course research the topic well enough that you can talk about it to the class.

For grade 11’s and 12’s, your presentation must be based on a Google Docs slideshow. You must also submit the form, but you will also need to prepare a short slideshow and share it with your instructor (filename: Full Name Course Code Cool Tech – Name of Topic).

Note that these two assignments must be done in each half-semester—one in the first half of the semester and one in the last half.

Sources of Material

Relevant Expectations

ICS3C

  • D3.1 explain how emerging technologies can affect personal rights and privacy (e.g. video surveillance, cyberbullying, identity theft);
  • D3.2 describe some emerging technologies and their implications for, and potential uses by, various members of society;
  • D3.3 describe some of the solutions to complex problems affecting society that have been or are being developed through the use of advanced computer programming and emerging technologies (e.g., monitoring and regulating electrical supply and demand; using facial recognition programs to verify the identity of persons entering a country; analysing criminal activity by overlaying crime data on satellite imagery; analysing large-scale meteorological data to predict catastrophic storms).

ICS3U

  • D2.1 demonstrate an understanding of emerging areas of research in computer science (e.g., cryptography, parallel processing, distributed computing, data mining, artificial intelligence, robotics, computer vision, image processing, human–computer interaction, security, geographic information systems [GIS]);
  • D2.2 demonstrate an understanding of an area of collaborative research between computer science and another field (e.g., bioinformatics, geology, economics, linguistics, health informatics, climatology, sociology, art);
  • D2.3 report on an area of research related to computer science, using an appropriate format (e.g., website, presentation software, video).

ICS4C

  • D3.1 describe the evolution of some emerging programming languages;
  • D3.2 investigate and report on innovations in information technology (e.g., webcasting, VoIP, multiplayer online gaming) and their potential impact on society and the economy;
  • D3.3 describe programming requirements for a variety of emerging technologies (e.g., web programming, smartphones, embedded systems).
ICS4U

  • D3.1 explain the impact of a variety of emerging technologies on various members of society and on societies and cultures around the world and on the economy;
  • D3.2 investigate an emerging technology and produce a report using an appropriate format (e.g., technical report, website, presentation software, video).

TDJ3M

  • C2.1 research and compare technological eras (e.g., agricultural, industrial, information), and describe ways in which societal needs influenced these eras;
  • C2.2 research and describe cases where technological design has improved the quality of living (e.g., fireproofing, prosthetic limbs, air purifiers, catalytic converters);
  • C2.3 demonstrate an understanding of ways in which history, trends, culture, and geography have inspired technological design.

TGJ4M

  • C2.1 independently research and report on political, economic, cultural, and/or environmental issues that affected technological innovations in the past (e.g., traffic congestion spurred development of compact vehicles, increasing population density led to the construction of taller buildings);
  • C2.2 describe examples of how culture, economics, and politics could influence the future design of products and/or processes (e.g., environmental awareness and rising costs for fossil fuels could increase the development and use of alternative energy sources);
  • C2.3 describe how technological change affects society (e.g., developments in telecommunications, health care, and robotics).

TGJ2O

  • C2.1 demonstrate an understanding of social standards and cultural sensitivity and use appropriate and inclusive content, images, and language in communications media productions (e.g., including people from different races, cultures, and backgrounds in media productions; portraying minority groups with respect and sensitivity; avoiding sexism, homophobia, and cultural or racial bias);
  • C2.2 describe the effects of recent changes in communications technology and applications on society and the economy (e.g., effects arising from the use of devices such as cellular phones, personal digital assistants [PDAs], and portable media players and from the emergence of computer-based social networks, user-generated web content such as wikis and blogs, and easy-to-download music file formats);
  • C2.3 identify emerging communications technologies and describe their potential impact on society and the economy;
  • C2.4 describe legal concepts and issues relating to communications technology and media production (e.g., copyright, privacy rights, consent);
  • C2.5 describe social and ethical issues relating to the use of communications technology (e.g., promotion of hatred, irresponsible use of the Internet, cyberbullying, cultural appropriation).

Website Review Guidelines

Your web page must be educational and include specific, appropriate content related to the provided topic. It must not be a page that only includes links to other websites.

You should not write your review until it has been approved by the instructor as being relevant and unique (i.e. not already chosen by another student). To get the website approved, fill in this form and see your instructor ASAP.  [teacher link]

Submission Form


[Teacher Link]

Review Format

After the website has been approved, write the review using this format:

Title
URL

Intro paragraph — “I chose this website because…” (or similar)

Review paragraphs, for each of the four categories shown below.

Ratings, as shown below.

Use the following rating system for the review, giving the website of 1-5 (in asterisks) for the categories shown:

Educational: *****
Organization: *****
Suitability: *****
Aesthetics: *****

…as well as an Overall rating from 1-5.

To submit your review, you will be given a link to a Google Document where you can write your review.

Example Review

DC Circuits
http://www.physics.uoguelph.ca/tutorials/ohm/Q.ohm.html

I chose this website because it had content that looked like it closely matched what we were learning in class.

Educational: This site has a lot of useful information such as Ohm’s Law and basic schematic diagrams but it doesn’t take the time to make the concepts clear for the reader (important if you’re new to electronics like me). I would have appreciated more applied explanations of the topics before just leaping in like they did.

Organization: A side navigation bar would be greatly beneficial to this website. I found it troublesome to have to go to the bottom of every page to choose my destination. The provided links do the job though (i.e. Back, Next, Return to Main…)

Suitability: This site is fairly suitable for our class as it touches on similar electronics-related topics, however I would not recommend it as a resource simply because there is much clearer, well laid-out information available on other sites on the web.

Aesthetics: This site has a very uninteresting look to it. It makes it easy to read, but does not grab your attention or interest.

Ratings:

Educational: **
Organization: ***
Suitability: ***
Aesthetics: *

Overall: ***

Marking Method

10% will be deducted if there is no title.

Up to 10% will be deducted for each grammar or spelling error that has to be fixed.

Up to 10% will be deducted for each category of the rating system that is not mentioned in the review (which is impossible to do if you follow the guidelines!).

20% will be deducted if there is no rating.

Things Not To Say in Your Review

“This website contains a large amount of information on it.” (Be specific about content.)
“All I can say is Wow. After finding many sites that didn’t do jack for me I found a great site. I found it hard to believe that this site is hosted on a Geocities account.” (A lot of words without saying anything specific about the site.)
“This website is jam packed full of goodies.” (What kind of goodies? Be specific about content.)
“This site is very nice.” (Says nothing about the site.)

Chrome Sign In

For students having trouble signing into Chrome with their DSBN account, enter this address directly into the Chrome address bar and you should be able to sign in properly:

chrome://chrome-signin

Why sign into Chrome?

It will sync your bookmarks and Chrome extensions so wherever you are logged into Chrome (other classes, at home, on your laptop) everything will be sync’d.

Tree in Niagara Falls

Download this photo into your working folder.

Rename the file “Full Name Tree Assignment.jpg”.

Using Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Affinity Photo, or GIMP, edit out the tree so the falls are unobstructed. You may wish to refer to this tutorial on how to use the Clone tool.

Hand in to the relevant handin folder.

Already done this assignment?

Note: for students who have done this assignment previously, use this street scene (jpg) instead. Be sure to remove all parking meters, flags, light poles, satellite dishes and antennas, and any garbage in the street. Name your file “Full Name Street Scene Assignment.jpg” and hand it into the same handin folder as the tree assignment.  [backup copy of jpg]

Note: extra images are available here: http://goo.gl/Svlyn (courtesy Vikki Watterworth)

The Design Process

Design Process

This design process model is based on the Ontario 2008 Technological Education curriculum.

From the curriculum:

“Although processes such as this involve a framework of sequential steps, they are typically iterative processes that may require a retracing of steps, diversions to solve specific problems along the way, or even a return to the start of the process if it becomes clear that the situation needs to be clarified and the problem redefined. Problem solvers soon discover that the process calls for an open mind, the freedom to be creative, and a great deal of patience and persistence.”

The graphic above is based on one created by Jackie Griffith. Thanks to Jackie for allowing me to adapt it.

Click here to take a comical look at the design process!

Email Assignment

Awkward!
Picture source unknown.

What is a “Professional Use” Email Account?

A professional use email account is one that you would not be embarrassed to use with your employer or with the public. It must also be an accurate representation of your full name, not a nickname. Also, it must be an email address that is not related to your ISP (Internet Service Provider). Good, permanent email hosts are Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo. My own preference is Gmail because it integrates with tools like Picasa, Google Drive and Docs, the Google Group we may be using in this class, Google Keep, and other products.

Class Email Protocol

Be sure to include the course code in the subject line as well as some indication of what the subject is. Do not leave the subject line blank. An appropriate subject for this assignment would be:

TGJ2O Email Assignment

When replying, please include any previous dialog we have already had.

Assignment Overview

Send me (pbeens@gmail.com) an email from your “permanent and professional use” email account. In it, please tell me:

  • why you took this course,
  • what you are hoping to do in this course,
  • whether or not you are pursuing a career related to this course,
  • what background you have in this subject (hobbies, previous courses), and
  • what mark you hope to get.

(It might help to copy-and-paste the questions into your email.)

Note: be sure to read the Class Email Protocol above so you know what is expected in the subject line.

After I receive your email, I will send a quick reply so you are added to my address book.

Article: How (and why) to use Google Photos on your iPhone or iPad

Article source: https://goo.gl/OyllG4

Installing Google Photos on your mobile device is a recommendation I make to all my students.

If you take pictures with your smartphone, it’s silly not to use Google Photos. At a minimum, it serves as a safe backup for all your photos, at no cost to you. A bonus is that Google Photos creates cool content of some of your images, including instagram-stylized photos, animations, and collages. Continue reading “Article: How (and why) to use Google Photos on your iPhone or iPad”