Affinity Photo Tutorials

This list of tutorials has been recommended by my students (from this master list) and is a work in progress. The order of the tutorials is somewhat random right now but will be reordered based on student feedback.

    1. Beginners – Adjustments (difficulty: 1)
    2. Beginners – Exporting (difficulty: 1)
    3. Beginners – Filters (difficulty: 1)
    4. Beginners – Layers (difficulty: 1)
    5. Cutting Out (difficulty: 1)
    6. Haze Removal (difficulty: 1)
    7. Changing Eye Colour (difficulty: 2)
    8. Inpainting (difficulty: 2)
    9. Layer Concepts (difficulty: 2)
    10. Shadows/Highlights (difficulty: 2)
    11. Curves (difficulty: 2)
    12. Cloning (difficulty: 2)
    13. Refining Selections (difficulty: 2)
    14. Lighting (difficulty: 2)
    15. Adjustment Layers (difficulty: 3)
    16. Mask Layers (difficulty: 3)

Multiplicity

See the example photos below for an idea of what this assignment is about.
It is highly recommended that you use a tripod for this assignment, but it can be done without.
Be sure you submit your assignment with all the layers intact. Do NOT flatten the image.
Here are some instructions created by a former student that may help if you don’t know how to proceed.
If you wish to practise using the images used in the first example, you can download them from here.
Mr Beens (images)
Sammi C.
Connor H.
Alexis R

Artist Profile

Create a Google Presentation slideshow similar to the one found here.

In your slideshow, profile an artist or photographer whose work you find inspirational. Include a minimum of ten pieces of work, if possible, and be prepared to share your research on the artist and your thoughts and research on each of the pieces, including why you chose that piece, what’s unique and/or inspirational about it, and any history you feel is relevant.

Name your presentation “Full Name Course Code Artist Profile – Name of Artist“, and submit it in Google Classroom.

For the intro to your live presentation, explain why you chose this artist or photographer and any relevant information you learned about the artist.

For marking, consider:

  • Have you included the minimum number of pieces?
  • Have you fully researched the background of the artist?
  • Have you researched the history of each of the pieces?

Note: Submit the name of the artist or photographer in Google Classroom in the comments. First-come-first-served!

Finding Vivian Maier, Chicago Street Photographer

(Originally posted 

This is a story of a full-time nanny/part-time street photographer in Chicago named Vivian Maier. Vivian sadly passed away in April of 2009, with her photographic work totally unknown to the world. It took a local real estate agent named John Maloof to uncover her amazing talent after purchasing her negatives at an auction. He hadn’t heard of Vivian, and only bought the negatives in a search for some content for a book he was writing. It was when he was scanning the negatives that he realized what he had.

John didn’t know what to do with this amazing body of work, so he started by putting together a blog to showcase some of the photos. He then reached out to the flickr community for ideas. It was there that someone recommended John look for funding on Kickstarter.com, which is how I learned about it.

John is looking for $20,000 to help fund the pre-production of a documentary movie he’d like to put together about Vivian and her work. The fundraising started two weeks ago, and not surprisingly once you realize the talent Vivian had, they have already exceeded their $20,000 target, with over two months left in the fundraising process!

I was extremely fortunate to be the last backer to receive a film spool for my $10 donation, but I think I will also donate another $25 to be able to download a copy of the movie once it is complete.

I’m quite moved by this story and find it very inspiring, both as an amateur photographer and frankly, as a human being. There is so much negativity in the world that a story like this just lifts your spirits — at least that’s the effect it had on me.

Vivian Maier Slideshow

(Originally posted )

Last week I visited an exhibition of Vivian Maier’s photography at the Chicago Cultural Center. I had learned about Vivian Maier earlier through the Kickstarter website and blogged about it here.

To say I was impressed with the exhibit is an understatement. The whole story about her work being discovered and shared with the world is incredibly fascinating and inspirational, so much so, that I decided to visit Chicago to see her pictures in person.

Sadly, there weren’t any books of her photos for me to buy to bring home as a memory, so I decided to assemble a group of her photos into a slideshow instead. 

I’ve made an attempt to organize the photos into groups, to try to educate myself as to how she viewed the world, and maybe get a glimpse into what her thoughts were as she wandered alone, taking her photos. They are loosely organized into the following themes:

  • self-portraits
  • legs
  • people that don’t know they are being photographed
  • people that do know they are being photographed
  • elderly people
  • children
  • people on beaches
  • street demise
  • travel
  • the exhibit

This slideshow is by no means comprehensive of all the work that has been released, as some of the “themes” have as few as two photos in them. Perhaps as more photos get released I will add to it.

Enjoy!

Daily Reminders

  • Use your organizer keep track of tasks and deadlines. My own preference is Google Keep but many students also seem to like Google Tasks, which is built into Gmail.
  • Check the daybook (or Classroom, whichever is being used in class) and your email at the beginning of every class.
  • Use your organizer to record your tasks and deadlines. Get in the habit of working from your organizer. If you are starting a new assignment, put it on your organizer first.
  • If you’ve received a mark update, check it for any errors or outstanding items. If you have any concerns, talk to me immediately or make a note of it on your to-do list.
  • Is your mark below 60%? If it is, expect me to talk to you about spending some lunch hours in the class to catch up.
  • If one of your class assignments is a ePortfolio (all classes except ICS), ask yourself if there is anything you can add to it today. Then do so!
  • At the end of every period, please push your chair in, throw out (or recycle) your garbage, and turn off your computer if it is the last period of the day.

Student Support

I can always be contacted via email (please see email protocol) or through my “contact me” form or through the Remind service app (preferred).

Remember that I want you to pass, so please take advantage of the communication tools available to you to reach out to me any time you have a question.

TGJ2O TGJ3M TGJ4M Mark Breakdown

1Students are expected to come to the exam period to discuss their portfolio with the instructor. For TGJ2O students that meet the exam exemption criteria set by the school (mark > 70%, maximum 9 days away, all major assignments completed, and no suspensions), they will be exempt from attending the interview but are still encouraged to come in.

TGJ3M Outline

 

Old Material (for reference only)