Students’ Favourite Affinity Designer Tutorials

At the end of this semester I asked the Communications Technology students to share which Affinity Designer tutorials were their favourites and why.

Following are their responses.

Creamsicle Vector
https://bit.ly/2FBzSbl

This was one of the tutorials that I found on my own, and I really enjoyed it. It was a fun tutorial that involved using a lot of basic tools in different ways to create a fun illustration.

Some of the skills used were masking, subtracting, changing stroke size, and changing fill opacity.

Retro Tutorial
https://bit.ly/2JSy93I

I enjoyed this tutorial as it involved a little bit of everything and taught me about reflections and node tools. It also got me to experiment with different tools and techniques.

I also learned the importance of grouping as it becomes very messy when there are 20 different lines and none were labeled.

Cute Rooster
https://bit.ly/2JVi1yJ

I enjoyed this tutorial because the end result turned out good and the instructions weren’t complicated. The tutorial also allowed you to customize your rooster to fit the theme that you want, not just Chinese New Year.

This tutorial taught me how to make advanced shapes using the pen tool. It also taught me why I need to group my layers together.

Flat Design Castle
https://bit.ly/2QUfpAw

This tutorial was one that I found. I liked it because of it’s symmetry and simple style. I liked it because it allowed freedom but also wasn’t very vague in it’s instructions, it struck a good balance between the two.

Some of the skills learned were Duplication of vectors and how to make things look like they have value.

Volkswagen Van
https://goo.gl/nwnN5i

Image result for Affinity Designer - Drawing a van

I really liked and enjoyed this tutorial for a couple of reasons. One, it was a super fun tutorial to follow and complete. Two, it really challenged you at some points. Three, it was a fun tutorial to follow and I had a great time doing it!

Also, I learned new techniques for the program which were very cool for me.

How to Create Patterns
https://bit.ly/2CqJnXq

I really liked this tutorial because it was very easy to follow. It was very clear and concise. It also looks really cool and complicated to make when in reality it was very simple. From this tutorial I needed a lot of patience, there was lots of little lines and very exact spacing measurements I needed to follow.

Python Trace
https://bit.ly/2HIIZEt

The video does a very good job on explaining on how to do the tracing but after showing you how to do one part of the snake it skips forward to coloring.

This Tutorial is very enjoyable but very tedious because there is a lot of repeating work but the enjoyable stuff is that you can customize the colors and stripes however you want and the finished project that comes out looks really nice.

Captain America Shield
https://bit.ly/2sUUPqt

I enjoyed this tutorial because it used a wide variety of skills and showed off the many parts of Affinity Designer while showing you a tangible way to use all of them.

Some skills I used include using different types of layers and how to use the pixel persona in Affinity Designer.

Festive Christmas Fireplace
https://bit.ly/2HLlv1o

I liked this tutorial because it was the most interesting out of all the tutorials and it didn’t take that long to make and it helped that the program was so good and it made is way easier and learning how to use it and fix my mistakes.


For those that don’t know about Affinity Designer, it’s what I’ve started using in class as an alternative to Adobe Illustrator. I just can’t substantiate paying Adobe’s ridiculous subscription fees when there is a fantastic and just as capable alternative available for a one-time fee of just $50 US.

See https://affinity.serif.com/en-gb/designer/ for details.

Important Update from Remind.com!

If you are a teacher using the Remind service you need to read this! You will have to share this information with your students.

We’re sorry to write with a disappointing update. As you might remember from this summer, Rogers Canada was planning to charge Remind a fee that made it impossible for us to continue supporting text messaging for anyone with a Rogers wireless plan. Now, Bell Canada has decided to charge Remind a similar fee as well.

Please read on for all the important details—we promise to keep this as short as we can.

What’s happening?
To offer our text messaging service free of charge, Remind has always paid for each text that users receive or send. Now, Rogers and Bell are charging us additional fees intended for companies that send spam over their networks. Remind messages aren’t spam, but our efforts to resolve the issue with the telecoms haven’t been successful.

As a result, the Rogers and Bell fees increase our costs of supporting SMS in Canada to at least 25X our current cost. This isn’t financially feasible for us to support, and it’s forcing us to end Remind text messaging for everyone who has a wireless plan on the Rogers and Bell networks.

How will this affect you?
Beginning January 28, 2019, people in your classes who normally get Remind texts will no longer receive your messages if they have wireless plans with Rogers, Bell, or their respective subsidiaries.

What can you do?
To make sure people in your classes continue receiving your messages, encourage them to download the mobile app or enable email notifications. Our team’s also working hard on a solution that allows your classes to continue to use Remind by text, and we’ll share more details with you before January 28.

In the meantime, we’ll keep fighting to make sure Canadian educators, students, and parents have access to effective communication. To do this, we need your help: If using Remind has made a positive impact in your classroom, at your school, or anywhere in between, please ask Rogers and Bell to reverse the fee here: www.remind.com/canada-carrier-fees

We’re very grateful for your support, and we’ll be in touch soon with an update.

Sincerely,
The Remind team

Testing Out the New VR System

VR Demo

Our first test of our new VR system, to be used to develop software in both my Computer Studies and Communications Technology classes.  Luckily we were able to get the hardware purchased and the software installed and working just in time for the open house tonight.

2018 OCTE Survey

(posted on behalf of OCTE)
This is a last call to help complete the 2018 Technological Education Survey before you leave for summer!
Thank you to all of you who participated in last year’s Technological Education Teacher survey!  We have used the results of the survey to move a number of new OCTE initiatives forward and to develop an OCTE Multi-Year Plan 2018 – 2021.
Here is a link to last year’s Technological Education Research Report.
We have once again partnered with the Ministry of Education to continue this research, inform our new and ongoing OCTE initiatives and to create a baseline of data to measure improvements.  We are asking for your help and your voice once again to complete this year’s Technological Education survey, which should take about 10 minutes to complete.
We appreciate your help in sharing this with other Technological Education teachers who are not here at the conference.
Thank you very much!  Your feedback allows us to keep OCTE relevant and addressing your current needs.
Dave Lewis
Chair of OCTE