TGJ4M Expectations

This course enables students to further develop media knowledge and skills while designing and producing projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students may work in the areas of TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology, and will investigate career opportunities and challenges in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Prerequisite: Communications Technology, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Note: a printable copy of this page is available here.

A. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 

By the end of this course, students will:

A1. demonstrate an understanding of advanced concepts, techniques, and skills required to produce a range of communications media products and services;

A2. describe different types of equipment and software and explain how they are used in creating communications media products;
A3. demonstrate an understanding of technical terminology, scientific concepts, and mathematical concepts used in communications technology, and apply them to the creation of media products;
A4. demonstrate an understanding of and apply the interpersonal and communications skills necessary to work in a team environment.SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

A1. Core Concepts, Techniques, and Skills

By the end of this course, students will:

A1.1 demonstrate an understanding of advanced concepts (e.g., floor direction, broadcast script writing, foley and soundtrack production, high dynamic range photography, advanced studio lighting) and creative and production techniques (e.g., pre-press workflow, image optimization, photo workflow, streaming media production) used to produce a range of communications products or services;

A1.2 describe the characteristics of interfaces (e.g., USB, IEEE 1394, optical connector) used to connect components of a communications system (e.g., video or digital cameras to computers, computers to printers, microphones to sound mixing and processing equipment);

A1.3 operate communications technology equipment and devices correctly and use software applications effectively to perform a variety of production tasks (e.g., select appropriate formats and aspect ratios for video productions; control digital video and audio equipment such as video monitors, cameras, DVD recorders, scanners, microphones, and computers).

A2. Equipment and Software

By the end of this course, students will:

A2.1 describe different types of communications devices and their components (e.g., cameras, lighting equipment, audio and video recorders, audio mixers, scanners, printing equipment) and explain how they are used to produce communications products and services;

A2.2 demonstrate a thorough understanding of different types of communications software (e.g., software for photo, audio, and video editing, animation, page layout, web page creation, and computer graphics) and their application in the production of various communications products.

A3. Technical Terminology and Scientific and Mathematical Concepts

By the end of this course, students will:

A3.1 demonstrate an understanding of communications technology terms, and use them correctly in oral and written communication (e.g., kerning, framing, key frame, jump cut, peaking, video switching, audio levels, dissolve, signals, layers, vector, file formats, proofs, file management and compression, headroom, noseroom, voice-overs);

A3.2 demonstrate an understanding of scientific concepts that relate to processes and technologies used in communications technology (e.g., light and colour theory, digital encoding of light and sound, fibre optics, operation of image sensors, principles of various printing technologies[offset, gravure, flexographic, letterpress, inkjet, electrostatic]);

A3.3 use appropriate formulas and calculations to solve problems in pre-production, production, and post-production work (e.g., calculating frame rates, timelines, resolutions, file compression ratios).

A4. Teamwork

By the end of this course, students will:

A4.1 describe and apply a variety of team-building strategies (e.g., cooperative discussion, collaboration strategies, conflict resolution strategies, motivational strategies, respect for the ideas of others);

A4.2 demonstrate an understanding of and apply techniques for encouraging collaboration and building consensus (e.g., sharing information, resources, and expertise; providing opportunities for all to participate; listening);

A4.3 demonstrate an understanding of leadership techniques (e.g., provide clear expectations, recognize contributions, value opinions, communicate progress, criticize constructively) and apply them in a team setting.

B. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY SKILLS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 

By the end of this course, students will:

B1. apply project management techniques to the planning and development of communications media projects;

B2. apply a design process or other problem-solving processes or strategies to meet a range of challenges in communications technology;
B3. create products or productions that demonstrate competence in the application of creative and technical skills and incorporate current and evolving standards, processes, formats, and technologies.SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

B1. Project Management

By the end of this course, students will:

B1.1 use a variety of planning techniques and tools (e.g., research, project proposals, design briefs, storyboards, site maps, production schedules) when creating plans for communications technology projects;

B1.2 use a variety of software applications to manage time and resources throughout a project (e.g., scheduling software to produce production schedules and track progress, spreadsheet software to produce equipment availability lists and edit decision lists);

B1.3 use review procedures to measure progress and adapt plans and processes as necessary to ensure timely and accurate completion of projects.

B2. Problem Solving

By the end of this course, students will:

B2.1 define a problem or challenge precisely and in adequate detail, taking into account relevant contextual or background information;

B2.2 define project objectives and performance criteria precisely and in adequate detail, and assess the effects of constraints such as cost, time, or technology restrictions that will limit design or problem-solving options;

B2.3 use a variety of information sources and research techniques to help identify possible solutions (e.g., conducting Internet and library searches, checking manuals and other printed materials, consulting experts);

B2.4 use idea-generating techniques such as brainstorming, or clarification techniques such as situation analyses, to help identify possible solutions;

B2.5 use charts or hand-drawn sketches to organize sequences, clarify relationships, or compare alternatives;

B2.6 evaluate possible solutions to identify those criteria within the existing constraints.

B3. Process and Production Skills

By the end of this course, students will:

B3.1 use advanced procedures to set up and operate media production equipment (e.g., cameras, lighting equipment, audio and video recorders, audio mixers, video switchers, scanners, printing equipment, camera supports);

B3.2 apply creative skills, equipment operating skills, and software skills to create and integrate components for a media production (e.g., news copy, video footage, voice-overs, graphics, animations for a TV news broadcast);

B3.3 demonstrate an understanding of and apply industry standards for technical manipulations (e.g., lighting, colour balance) and calibrations (e.g., input and output devices, monitors);

B3.4 produce rich media products that conform to evolving industry standards and formats (e.g., interactive graphics, streamed video, radio broadcasts).

C. TECHNOLOGY, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIETY

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

C1. analyse the environmental impact of recent advances in communications technology, and describe ways of reducing harmful effects;

C2. demonstrate an understanding of the effects of communications technology and media activities on society and cultural diversity.SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

C1. Technology and the Environment

By the end of this course, students will:

C1.1 analyse the environmental costs and benefits, local and global, of recent innovations in communications technology (e.g., costs and benefits related to resource usage, energy demand, waste disposal, toxic substances, radiation, air and water pollution);

C1.2 describe ways of minimizing or avoiding harmful environmental effects caused by communications technologies and media activities (e.g., upgrade products rather than dispose of them; turn off equipment that is not being used; treat dead batteries as toxic waste; recycle used paper and printer cartridges).

C2. Technology and Society

By the end of this course, students will:

C2.1 describe how cultural diversity can be reflected in media products (e.g., by offering specific programming for narrowcasting to different cultural groups, creating content in minority languages, choosing project topics that reflect the interests of diverse communities, using inclusive content and images);

C2.2 evaluate the societal and cultural effects of converging and emerging technologies (e.g., in digital imaging, interface design, interactive media) from various perspectives (e.g., the head of an established business, an entrepreneur, a media worker, a consumer).

D. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

D1. demonstrate an understanding of and apply safe work practices when performing communications technology tasks;

D2. demonstrate an understanding of and adhere to legal requirements and ethical practices relating to the communications technology industry;
D3. demonstrate an understanding of career opportunities and career development in a rapidly changing technological environment, and maintain a portfolio of their work as evidence of their qualifications for future education and employment.SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

D1. Health and Safety

By the end of this course, students will:

D1.1 describe industry hazards (e.g., ergonomic, mechanical, electrical, and chemical hazards), identify sources of hazard information (e.g., Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System [WHMIS], Passport to Safety), and describe methods of preventing accidents (e.g., safety audits, regular safety training);

D1.2 demonstrate an understanding of and apply safe work practices (e.g., using ergonomically designed equipment and work areas, keeping equipment in proper working order, maintaining a well-organized workplace, using lockout procedures when installing or maintaining equipment, wearing gloves when handling hot lights, using a spotter when climbing ladders, keeping liquids away from electronic equipment) when performing communications technology procedures.

D2. Professional Standards and Ethics

By the end of this course, students will:

D2.1 describe various ways in which ownership may exist and be protected in creative, intellectual, or artistic works (e.g., copyright, trademarks, patents);

D2.2 use appropriate methods to reference the words, ideas, information, research, or findings of others (e.g., footnotes, endnotes, parenthetical references, bibliographies, credit lists, acknowledgements, permission lists).

D3. Career Opportunities

By the end of this course, students will:

D3.1 describe career opportunities in existing, converging, and emerging communications technologies (e.g., digital imaging, interactive game development, graphic arts, web/interactive media design, audio/video production);

D3.2 describe the effects of rapidly changing technology on employment opportunities in communications technology;

D3.3 identify professional organizations associated with the various communications technology fields (e.g., TV, video, and movie production; radio; audio and sound production; print and graphic communications; photography and digital imaging; broadcast journalism; interactive new media), and describe their role in professional support and development;

D3.4 explain the need for lifelong learning in the communications technology industry;

D3.5 demonstrate an understanding of and apply the Essential Skills that are important for success in the communications technology industry, as identified in the Ontario Skills Passport (e.g., reading text, computer use, oral communication, thinking skills);

D3.6 demonstrate an understanding of and apply the work habits that are important for success in the communications technology industry, as identified in the Ontario Skills Passport (e.g., working safely, teamwork, reliability, initiative, customer service, entrepreneurship);

D3.7 maintain an up-to-date portfolio that includes pieces of work and other materials that provide evidence of their skills and achievements in communications technology (e.g., work logs, skills checklist, photographs, digital media, sketches, drawings), and explain why having a current portfolio is important for career development and advancement.

TEJ4E Expectations

A. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

A1. describe the function and development of a variety of current computer hardware;
A2. describe network topologies, devices, and connection media as well as common user network requirements;
A3. describe various types of software, analyse software needs, and evaluate available software.

SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS

A1. Computer Hardware

By the end of this course, students will:

A1.1 accurately use relevant technical terminology to describe the specifications of computer hardware (e.g., type, speed, capacity, compatibility, connections);

A1.2 describe the characteristics of processor types (e.g., 32-bit, 64-bit, multi-core);

A1.3 describe the operation of current input and output devices (e.g., keyboards, mice, tablets, printers, monitors, scanners, webcams);

A1.4 describe the evolution of home computing (e.g., cost, availability, and ease of use of computing systems);

A1.5 describe hardware innovations in computers and related technologies (e.g., lower costs, faster speeds, smaller sizes, and greater memory density for computers and for cellular, hand-held, and biometrics devices);

A1.6 explain the effect of trends in software design and data storage on hardware requirements and data processing (e.g., the need for increased processor speed, memory, storage capacity, and bandwidth; longer boot times; large increases in the number and size of files).

A2. Networking Concepts

By the end of this course, students will:

A2.1 research and describe common network topologies and technologies;

A2.2 compare hardware and connection media(e.g., hardware: hub, switch, router; media: UTP, fibre-optic cable, wireless) used for different types of networks (e.g., home and small office, small-to-medium enterprise);

A2.3 describe common user requirements that affect the design of a network (e.g., shared printer, wireless access, shared Internet connection, remote access).

A3. Software

By the end of this course, students will:

A3.1 describe the purpose and basic operation of an operating system;

A3.2 describe the purpose and basic operation of common application software (e.g., word processors, spreadsheets, databases, programming environments);

A3.3 describe the purpose and basic operation of various types of utility software (e.g., system tools, backup and recovery software, antivirus and anti-spyware programs, security suites);

A3.4 analyse user software needs for a given purpose;

A3.5 evaluate the suitability of available software for a specific task;

A3.6 describe the specific minimum hardware configurations required for various software.

B. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY SKILLS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

B1. determine and report on hardware solutions for user computing needs;
B2. install, maintain, and troubleshoot computer hardware, and design backup procedures;
B3. install, configure, manage, maintain, and troubleshoot computer networks and related services;
B4. install, configure, and update a variety of software.

SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS

B1. Hardware Solutions

By the end of this course, students will:

B1.1 use a problem-solving process (see pp. 21–23) to find solutions for user hardware needs, and compare and contrast solutions for various situations(e.g., home computing, desktop publishing, small business, large office);

B1.2 compare hardware availability and costs from local, national, and global suppliers;

B1.3 write a report recommending computing hardware to meet user requirements.

B2. Installation, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting

By the end of this course, students will:

B2.1 develop and follow procedures for hardware installation, service, and troubleshooting;

B2.2 document and follow correct procedures to prevent damage to computer components (e.g., use of anti-static wrist straps, mats, bags, and containers);

B2.3 perform preventive maintenance on a variety of hardware components;

B2.4 use utility software and/or diagnostic tools to correct problems on a computer and/or a network;

B2.5 design effective procedures for backing up system data and user information.

B3. Network Setup and Management

By the end of this course, students will:

B3.1 develop and follow procedures for network installation, service, and troubleshooting;

B3.2 set up and/or configure networked workstations and shared devices using appropriate connection media (e.g., UTP straight-through and cross-over cables, serial cables, fibre optics, wireless);

B3.3 install and configure network operating systems and client services;

B3.4 use network utility software (e.g., protocol analyser, extended ping, extended traceroute) to diagnose and correct problems.

B4. Software Implementation

By the end of this course, students will:

B4.1 install and configure new software and upgrades on a computer system;

B4.2 describe the need for software, firmware, and device-driver upgrades, identify various sources for them, and follow proper procedures for installing the various types of upgrades;

B4.3 compare software availability and costs from local, national, and global suppliers;

B4.4 use manuals and online documentation to explore the features of new software.

C. TECHNOLOGY, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIETY

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

C1. describe environmental issues related to the widespread use of computer technology, and apply strategies to reduce environmental harm from computer use;
C2. analyse societal issues related to the widespread use of computer technology.

SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS

C1. Technology and the Environment

By the end of this course, students will:

C1.1 assess the effects of computer technology on the environment (e.g., leakage of hazardous substances from obsolete computers dumped in landfills or improperly recycled; increased energy use; benefits of computer-controlled heating and cooling systems);

C1.2 outline and apply strategies to recycle and reuse computer components (e.g., build computers using used components and donate to a community partner, offer a service where computers can be upgraded using used components);

C1.3 describe and apply strategies and devices that help reduce the energy used by computers at home and in the workplace (e.g., software that throttles drive speed and CPU speed, monitors that turn off automatically, more efficient processors, lower-speed hard drives, diskless computers, virtualization to eliminate extra computers).

C2. Technology and Society

By the end of this course, students will:

C2.1 analyse the benefits of computer technology for society (e.g., improved access to technology for economically disadvantaged people and nations, greater efficiency and lower costs for information services, development of a “global village”, use of computers to help monitor and predict long-term environmental changes);

C2.2 analyse the drawbacks of computer technology for society (e.g., Internet gambling addictions, more sedentary lifestyle, spam, telemarketing, loss of privacy).

D. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

D1. explain and follow computer-related safety standards and practices;
D2. describe ethical and security issues related to the use of computers;
D3. demonstrate an understanding of professional customer-service practices;
D4. apply the skills required for success in the workplace;
D5. describe opportunities for careers and training related to computer technology, and explain the need for lifelong learning in the computer technology industry.

SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS

D1. Health and Safety

By the end of this course, students will:

D1.1 explain the importance of following industry health and safety standards and practices (e.g., standards and regulations specified in the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System [WHMIS], the Electrical Safety Code, and the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and by the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board [WSIB]; ergonomically sound workplace arrangements and practices);

D1.2 describe and use appropriate equipment, techniques, and strategies to avoid health and safety problems when assembling, using, and maintaining computer systems (e.g., repetitive strain injuries, eye strain, electrical shock);

D1.3 research and discuss issues related to Internet safety (e.g., protection of information stored on computers or transmitted over a network, cyberstalking, cyberbullying, privacy policies).

D2. Ethics and Security

By the end of this course, students will:

D2.1 describe the components of an acceptable-use policy for computers (e.g., restrictions on commercial or personal use, prohibition of inappropriate content and plagiarism, protection of privacy and intellectual property rights);

D2.2 explain the reasons for software licensing agreements and registration procedures;

D2.3 explain the importance of computer security (e.g., passwords, security software updates, protecting personal identity information and client data).

D3. Customer Service

By the end of this course, students will:

D3.1 develop procedures for tracking client data electronically (e.g., using a spreadsheet, database, journal, or log);

D3.2 explain the importance of professionalism in customer relations (e.g., ensuring appropriate personal appearance, using active listening techniques, making eye contact, speaking clearly and respectfully, being approachable, being aware and respectful of diverse cultural communication styles);

D3.3 develop and model customer-service procedures for dealing with clients (e.g., procedures for complaints, troubleshooting, and providing customer support by telephone, email, or the Internet);

D3.4 communicate with clients using an appropriate level of technical terminology;

D3.5 model user-level support for software (e.g., simulate an IT help desk, create an FAQ website).

D4. Workplace Skills

By the end of this course, students will:

D4.1 demonstrate time-management skills in project settings (e.g., set realistic goals, recognize time constraints, plan for deadlines, prioritize tasks);

D4.2 conduct and participate in all aspects of effective meetings for various purposes (e.g., create and follow an agenda, write and circulate minutes, conduct chaired and roundtable meetings);

D4.3 use computer terminology correctly, and compile a glossary of computer terms and acronyms.

D5. Career Opportunities

By the end of this course, students will:

D5.1 explore various computer-related job opportunities in local, national, and international businesses and industries (e.g., retail salesperson, IT hardware technician, IT network technician, electronic service technician);

D5.2 describe the opportunities for and the importance of postsecondary training and certification related to computer technology (e.g., apprenticeship, college courses, trade certifications);

D5.3 explain the need for lifelong learning in the computer technology industry;

D5.4 demonstrate an understanding of and apply the Essential Skills that are important for success in the computer technology industry, as identified in the Ontario Skills Passport (OSP)(e.g., reading text, writing, document use, computer use, oral communication, numeracy, thinking skills);

D5.5 demonstrate an understanding of and apply the work habits that are important for success in the computer technology industry, as identified in the Ontario Skills Passport (e.g., working safely, teamwork, reliability, organization, working independently, initiative, self-advocacy, customer service);

D5.6 maintain an up-to-date portfolio that includes pieces of work and other materials that provide evidence of their skills and achievements in computer technology (e.g., Passport to Safety certificate, OSP Work Plan, OSP Transition Plan, work logs, photographs of projects), and explain why having a current portfolio is important for career development and advancement.

TEJ3M Expectations

A. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 
By the end of this course, students will:
A1. describe how computer components function, and discuss trends in the development of computer hardware;
A2. describe the functions of BIOSes and operating systems, and how they interact with each other and with computer hardware;
A3. describe the function of electronic components and the use of these components in control systems and other circuits, and calculate values for circuit components;
A4. describe network concepts, services, and security;
A5. demonstrate an understanding of the use of binary numbers, hexadecimal numbers, and Boolean algebra in computer logic and data processing.
SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

A1. Computer Hardware

By the end of this course, students will:
A1.1 describe how the internal components of a computer function (e.g., CPU, mainboard, disk drives, RAM, chipset, video card, sound card, expansion slot);
A1.2 describe various standards for connecting computer components (e.g., parallel port, RS-232, USB, IEEE 1394, VGA, DVI);
A1.3 describe trends in the development of computer hardware (e.g., size, cost, and speed of processors, memory, and hard drives; video resolution; capacity of optical disks).

A2. Computer Systems

By the end of this course, students will:
A2.1 describe the essential functions and other features of various operating systems (e.g., functions: management of resources, files, processes, and applications; features: services, usability, performance, applications such as text editor, web browser, or media player);
A2.2 describe changes that may be required when upgrading hardware components or features of a computer system (e.g., BIOS updates, installation of drivers for new hardware, resolution of compatibility issues);
A2.3 describe the essential functions performed by the BIOS firmware in computer systems (e.g., POST [power on self test], boot sequence, hardware recognition, detection of master boot record);
A2.4 describe how the BIOS, hardware, and operating system of a computer interact.

A3. Electronics, Robotics, and Computer Interfacing

By the end of this course, students will:
A3.1 identify and describe the functions of electronic components (e.g., resistor, capacitor, diode, LED);
A3.2 describe the function of electrical devices used in control systems (e.g., stepper motor, direct-current motor, touch sensor, accelerometer, optical sensor, power supply);
A3.3 calculate the values of components in electronic circuits using fundamental laws (e.g., Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws);
A3.4 explain the importance of advances in electronics (e.g., compare size, cost, and performance of vacuum tubes, transistors, and integrated circuits);
A3.5 compare the advantages and disadvantages of interfacing using desktop computers, micro-controllers, and programmable logic controllers.

A4. Networking Concepts

By the end of this course, students will:
A4.1 explain fundamental network concepts (e.g., bandwidth, throughput, full duplex, half duplex);
A4.2 explain the fundamental aspects of TCP/IP addressing as it pertains to workstations on a network (e.g., workstation IP address, subnet mask, MAC [media access control] address, default gateway address);
A4.3 describe various services offered by servers to network clients (e.g., HTTP, FTP, SMTP, telnet, printing, file transfers and storage, login);
A4.4 describe methods for making a network secure (e.g., firewalls, data and password encryption, user authentication, WEP or WPA keys, security of server room).

A5. Data Representation and Digital Logic

By the end of this course, students will:
A5.1 describe binary and hexadecimal numbers, and convert positive integers among decimal, binary, and hexadecimal number systems;
A5.2 compare binary and hexadecimal representation of addresses and data (e.g., absolute addressing, character codes, colours);
A5.3 relate Boolean algebra to the fundamental logic gates and to combinations of these gates, using symbolic, algebraic, and numeric representations.

B. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY SKILLS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 
By the end of this course, students will:
B1. build, configure, and maintain a computer system, and connect peripheral devices;
B2. set up, optimize, and back up a computer system;
B3. design, construct, create diagrams for, and troubleshoot electronic circuits and interfaces for control systems;
B4. design, install, configure, test, and troubleshoot networks;
B5. demonstrate an understanding of fundamental programming concepts, and develop a program that interacts with an external device.
SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

B1. Hardware Solutions

By the end of this course, students will:
B1.1 build a computer from parts to meet specified requirements (e.g., for gaming, business, entertainment, media centre, or graphic design);
B1.2 use correct procedures to prevent damage to sensitive components (e.g., use anti-static wrist straps and mats, disconnect power when inserting expansion cards);
B1.3 install and configure peripheral devices in a computer system (e.g., printer, video camera, external drives);
B1.4 document maintenance and troubleshooting of computer hardware on a day-to-day basis (e.g., use a journal or log to record work done, time taken, problems found, solutions attempted, and results).

B2. Computer Systems

By the end of this course, students will:
B2.1 set up and configure a home office system (e.g., computer, scanner, printer, appropriate software);
B2.2 use system utilities for optimization and backup (e.g., defragment files; scan hard drives for defective sectors; run complete, incremental, and differential backups);
B2.3 configure a computer system to use multiple operating systems (e.g., dual boot, virtual machines).

B3. Electronics, Robotics, and Computer Interfacing

By the end of this course, students will:
B3.1 use a design process (see pp. 22–23) to design and safely construct and test interfacing or robotics circuits (e.g., for LED traffic lights, VU meter, alarm system, or motor control), using appropriate materials and techniques, including soldering;
B3.2 troubleshoot an electronic circuit using appropriate methods and test equipment (e.g., methods: isolation and substitution of components; equipment: multimeter, oscilloscope, logic probe);
B3.3 draw and interpret diagrams that represent circuit components and functions (e.g., schematic diagram, block diagram, flow chart);
B3.4 use computer programs to simulate circuit performance and to draw schematic diagrams and circuit layouts (e.g., circuit simulator, schematic capture software, printed circuit board layout software).

B4. Network Setup and Management

By the end of this course, students will:
B4.1 design, install, and configure a peer-to-peer network (e.g., choose appropriate computers and network interfaces, construct cables, enable file sharing) using appropriate tools, materials, and equipment (e.g., UTP cable, 8P8C connectors, crimping tool, cable tester);
B4.2 draw diagrams of various LAN types (e.g., peer-to-peer, client-server) and topologies(e.g., bus, star, ring);
B4.3 construct various network cables (e.g., straight-through, crossover);
B4.4 use a variety of methods to verify the operation of a network (e.g., visual inspection, ping, ipconfig, telnet, tracert, arp);
B4.5 use a problem-solving process (see pp. 21–23) to troubleshoot networks.

B5. Computer Programming

By the end of this course, students will:
B5.1 use constants, variables, expressions, and assignment statements correctly, taking into account the order in which operations are performed;
B5.2 use input statements, output statements, selection structures, and repetition structures in a program;
B5.3 use a design process (see pp. 22–23) to write, test, and debug a computer program that controls and/or responds to the inputs from an external device (e.g., LED array, motor, relay, infrared sensor, temperature sensor).

C. TECHNOLOGY, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIETY

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 
By the end of this course, students will:
C1. describe environmental issues related to the widespread use of computers and associated technologies;
C2. describe societal issues related to the widespread use of computers and associated technologies.
SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

C1. Technology and the Environment

By the end of this course, students will:
C1.1 describe the effects of computer and electronic technology on the environment (e.g., accumulation of electronic waste, including lead and other toxic materials used in computers; release of ozone-destroying chemicals used to wash soldering flux from circuit boards; energy consumed by computers left in standby mode; fuel consumption and air pollution reduced by computerized traffic-control systems);
C1.2 outline how community partners and government agencies apply the reduce/reuse/recycle concept to computer technology.

C2. Technology and Society

By the end of this course, students will:
C2.1 describe the benefits of computer and electronic technology for society (e.g., greater efficiency and lower costs for information services, improved access to technology for economically disadvantaged people and nations, development of a “global village”);
C2.2 describe some of the drawbacks of computer and electronic technology for society (e.g., loss of privacy, infringement of intellectual property rights through unlicensed copying and electronic distribution, a more sedentary lifestyle, spam, telemarketing, Internet gambling addictions).

D. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 
By the end of this course, students will:
D1. demonstrate an understanding of relevant safety practices, standards, and legislation;
D2. describe ethical and security issues related to the use of computers;
D3. describe various careers related to computer technology and electronics, and the entry requirements for these careers.
SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS 

D1. Health and Safety

By the end of this course, students will:
D1.1 comply with relevant industry practices, standards, and related legislation to ensure workplace safety (e.g., standards and regulations specified in the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System [WHMIS] and the Electrical Safety Code; grounding and enclosure standards for electrical circuits; ergonomically sound workplace
arrangements and practices);
D1.2 describe and use appropriate equipment, techniques, and strategies to avoid health and safety problems associated with computer use (e.g., back injuries from improper lifting of heavy equipment, repetitive strain injuries, eye strain).

D2. Ethics and Security

By the end of this course, students will:
D2.1 describe the components of an acceptable-use policy for computers (e.g., restrictions on commercial or personal use, prohibition of inappropriate content, protection of privacy);
D2.2 explain the importance of and comply with software licensing legislation (e.g., copyright and patent acts);
D2.3 explain the importance of security (e.g., password protection, encryption) for confidential data and other sensitive electronic information (e.g., to protect against industrial espionage or identity theft).

D3. Career Opportunities

By the end of this course, students will:
D3.1 describe various careers related to computer technology and electronics that require postsecondary education (e.g., computer engineer, systems analyst, network analyst, information technology technician);
D3.2 describe entry requirements, including computer expertise, for careers related to computer technology (e.g., apprenticeships, university programs, college programs, industry certifications);
D3.3 identify groups and programs that are available to support students who are interested in pursuing non-traditional career choices in computer technology (e.g., mentoring programs, virtual networking/support groups, specialized postsecondary programs, relevant trade/industry associations);
D3.4 demonstrate an understanding of and apply the Essential Skills that are important for success in the computer technology industry, as identified in the Ontario Skills Passport (OSP)(e.g., reading text, writing, document use, computer use, oral communication, numeracy, thinking skills);
D3.5 demonstrate an understanding of and apply the work habits that are important for success in the computer technology industry, as identified in the Ontario Skills Passport (e.g., working safely, teamwork, reliability, organization, working independently, initiative, self-advocacy);
D3.6 maintain an up-to-date portfolio that includes pieces of work and other materials that provide evidence of their skills and achievements in computer technology (e.g., Passport to Safety certificate, OSP Work Plan, OSP Transition Plan, circuit diagrams, photographs of projects, video of working robot), and explain why having a current portfolio is important for career development and advancement.

WordPress Test Post via Google Docs

This is a quick test post using the new WordPress extension for Google Docs:

This morning I got excited by one of @dougpete’s tweets, specifically:

http://WordPress.com Unveils Google Docs Extension for Collaboration http://flip.it/SNPVUw via @flipboard

The extension being profiled is available here. Without reading any instructions, I installed it and proceeded to do this quick test.

Let’s see how it performs using images. This image has been copied and pasted in from the web.

What about tables?

A

B

A+B

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

0

1

1

1

1

I’m going to go ahead and post this directly from Google Docs and then provide some feedback below. Let’s see how it does!


Observation

While it did an adequate job of posting all the normal text, it botched up some indented text I had, it did not include the picture, and messed up the widths of my table.

This is how the above section should have looked:

WordPress Test Post via Google Docs (as seen in Google Docs)
WordPress Test Post via Google Docs (as seen in Google Docs)

Conclusion? This extension is not ready for prime time, unfortunately. For plain text documents, it’s fine, but for anything more complex than that then you might as well just compose your posts in WordPress directly.

Too bad…

BTT1O Expectations

Digital Literacy

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the terminology associated with information and communication technology;
  2. demonstrate an understanding of the computer workstation environment;
  3. manage electronic files and folders;
  4. analyse options for accessing the Internet;
  5. apply effective techniques when conducting electronic research.

Continue reading “BTT1O Expectations”

TEJ2O Computer Technology Expectations

The full curriculum with overall expectations and examples is available here.

TEJ2O Expectations Word Cloud

A. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS 
A1. identify and describe the functions of, as well as important advances related to, electronic and computer components;
A2. demonstrate a basic understanding of computer networks and their components;

A3. demonstrate a basic understanding of binary numbers and digital logic. Continue reading “TEJ2O Computer Technology Expectations”